3 Phrases You Need to Start Using With Every Single Customer

Ryan Taft

​I am not a big script guy. I have never been. Sales scripts are typically written from the perfect world perspective. In other words, if customers acted exactly the way we wanted them to and if sales people were robots, then a script is bullet proof. But sales, my friends, is not a perfect world.

I don’t know about you but every sales script I have ever been handed and told to use on customers, I read it thinking to myself “I would never say this.” I believe you should have your own sales voice in the process. That being said, there are a few concepts that must be expressed in every presentation. The key to the following phrases is not in the words, but in the intention behind the words.

Here are three phrases that must be expressed in every sales conversation.

1. “Thank you for coming in to _________ (my office, store, community, etc).”

One of the largest complaints I hear from sales people around the country is, “Customers don’t want to talk to me.” Well of course not…you are a sales person! If you really want to slow customers down to have a meaningful conversation with them, I suggest implementing a genuine and thankful greeting.

I am not talking about mulling out the words, “Thanks for coming in.” I am talking about sincerity. Customers need to feel that you truly appreciate them coming in to your place of business. Unfortunately, this is typically not the case. You can almost smell the commission breath coming out of most sales people as they greet customers. Remember, without customers, you wouldn’t have an income. So greet with an attitude of gratitude.

2. “Tell me more about that.”

My wife Melissa is arguably the most curious person I have ever met in my life. When she talks with someone, she forgets all about herself and dives into the life of whoever is standing in front of her. Her favorite phrase?? You guessed it, “Tell me more about that.”

Great sales people are insanely curious sales people. Look for opportunities to get more detail from customers as to why they want or need your product. Remember that when you know your customer well enough, he or she will show you how to sell them your product or service. So dig deeper using the shovel called “Tell me more about that.”

3. “Are you ready to move forward?”

For years, closing was taught as something you do “To” a customer. To be honest, it felt manipulative. You bet, if I am feeling that way, so are your customers. So let me reframe this for you so you can start to incorporate “Are you ready to move forward?” into your sales presentation.

What if the reason customers are talking to you in the first place was because they want to improve their lives? What if your product would help alleviate a current pain or dissatisfaction? I will just about guarantee that is the case with most customers. How can I guarantee that? Because:

Dissatisfaction/Pain Drives Traffic

That means if you don’t ask customers to move forward with your product or service, you are keeping them in their pain. Instead of closing as something you do “To” customers, closing is something you do “For” them.

Remember, the intention behind your words is more important than the words themselves.

By implementing these three phrases, with the right intention, into every presentation you give yourself the best chance to help improve your customers’ lives…and change their world.


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About the Author: Ryan Taft

Ryan Taft
Ryan Taft is consumed with a passion for helping others achieve breakthrough results in sales, business and life. With a career spanning two decades training and coaching sales teams from call centers to new home sales to Realtors®, Ryan combines his knowledge of human performance, psychology and sales skills development to deliver extraordinarily engaging, energizing and insightful training experiences that drive peak performance at all levels.  Learn more at jeffshore.com and follow Ryan on Twitter.